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136 Locations —— 956 Intersections

Yuki Okumura

21/01/2024 - 25/02/2024

Installation view, Yuki Okumura, ‘136 Locations — 956 Intersections’, Cento, 20 Albert Road, Glasgow.

 

Installation view, Yuki Okumura, ‘136 Locations — 956 Intersections’, Cento, 20 Albert Road, Glasgow.

 

Installation view, Yuki Okumura, ‘136 Locations — 956 Intersections’, Cento, 20 Albert Road, Glasgow.

 

Installation view, Yuki Okumura, ‘136 Locations — 956 Intersections’, Cento, 20 Albert Road, Glasgow.

 

Yuki Okumura, 7 Locations and 2 Intersections in Scotland, natural emulsion wall paint and wall plaster powder mixed with gum arabic on recycled A4 paper, 21 x 29.7 cm, 2024.

 

Yuki Okumura, 107 Locations and 888 Intersections in the United Kingdom, natural emulsion wall paint and wall plaster powder mixed with gum arabic on MDF board 83.5 x 51 cm, 2024

 

Yuki Okumura, 107 Locations and 888 Intersections in the United Kingdom (detail), natural emulsion wall paint and wall plaster powder mixed with gum arabic on MDF board 83.5 x 51 cm, 2024

 

Yuki Okumura, 29 Locations and 68 Intersections in the Rest of the World, natural emulsion wall paint and wall plaster powder mixed with gum arabic on MDF board 56 x 107.8 cm, 2024

 

Yuki Okumura, 29 Locations and 68 Intersections in the Rest of the World (detail), natural emulsion wall paint and wall plaster powder mixed with gum arabic on MDF board 56 x 107.8 cm, 2024

 

Yuki Okumura, 136 Postcards to 136 Locations, inviting the occupant(s) of every known location on earth bearing the address 20 Albert Road to the exhibition, dimensions variable, 2024

 

Installation view, Yuki Okumura, ‘136 Locations — 956 Intersections’, Cento, 20 Albert Road, Glasgow. Image courtesy of the artist and Cento.

 

136 Locations —— 956 Intersections
Yuki Okumura
21/01 – 25/02/24
Open Saturdays & Sundays 12—5 pm and by appointment

 

For we are where we are not. (‘Car nous sommes où nous ne sommes pas.’)
– Pierre-Jean Jouve, Lyrique, 1956; an epigraph in Gaston Bachelard’s The Poetics of Space (Beacon Press, 1994: p. 211).

Informed by his experience of working as a translator, Yuki Okumura’s oeuvre comprises a growing list of escape attempts from identity, individuality, and ego by exploring language, memory, chance-oriented methodologies and site-specific contexts.

Cento has invited the artist to produce an installation at 20 Albert Road, Glasgow. In response, he has determined 136 locations across the globe that, according to Google Maps, share the address 20 Albert Road.

An invitation card has been posted to all of the locations, both in the United Kingdom and the rest of the world, to announce the exhibition. The card sent to 20 Albert Road, Glasgow, and any that return, are presented as part of the installation, along with an artist’s book recording all the postal addresses, printed in an edition of 100.

The ‘956 Intersections’ of Okumura’s title refer to those generated when connecting all the locations on the map in alphabetical order, beginning with the second line of the address as listed on Google. The artist made a set of digital renderings that trace the locations in jagged forms. He has used these images as the schemata for paintings produced onsite in the days leading up to the exhibition.

The works comprise materials extant in 20 Albert Road: repurposed MDF panels; press release paper; plaster dust scraped from an exposed wall; and the natural emulsion normally used in the gallery. In the artist’s hand, the mechanical geometry of the diagrams produces a series of quivering harlequins.

The commission builds on Okumura’s body of work concerning art and place, and his interest in the legacies of conceptual art. His film The Man Who (2019) explored the possibility that Stanley Brouwn and On Kawara were the same person (‘29,771 days – 2,094,943 steps’, La Maison de Rendez-Vous, Brussels), while his 2016 project with Hisachika Takahashi investigated the two artists’ artistic and biographical overlaps (‘Hisachika Takahashi by Yuki Okumura’, Maison Hermès, Tokyo).

This exhibition deals with parallel realities across time and space, anchored by a single name – one that refers to a moment in British colonial history and visualises the ripples of empire across the globe. Australia, Canada, India, New Zealand, Pakistan, South Africa, United States of America: the Albert Roads found in each of these countries were commonly named after Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, the consort of Queen Victoria (1819–1901).

The late Queen Elizabeth II’s head stamps the exhibition invitation cards sent within the UK; the new King’s head marks the others. They travel towards their various destinations to meet an ancestral name. Addresses find their sources, as splinters and shreds of a colonial legacy. 136 locations, 136 marks.

 

BIOGRAPHY

Yuki Okumura was born in 1978 in Aomori, Japan, and currently lives and works mainly in the Central European Time zone. Recent exhibitions include ‘Aichi Triennale 2022: Still Alive’, Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art, 2022; ‘Landslide to be lived off and/or tongues to be deadpan’, MISAKO & ROSEN, Tokyo, 2021; ‘The Man Who, An Ephemeral Archive’, Keio University Art Center, Tokyo, 2019; ‘Na(me/am)’, Convent, Ghent, 2018; ‘Hisachika Takahashi by Yuki Okumura’, Maison Hermès Le Forum, Tokyo, 2016; and ‘Un-Scene III’, WIELS, Brussels, 2015. A major solo exhibition by Okumura is scheduled to take place at Secession, Vienna, in February 2025.

WITH THANKS TO Rachel Adams, Neil Clements, Esther Draycott, Luciana Janaqui, Andrew Mummery, Ewan Murray, M/M (Paris), MISAKO & ROSEN (Tokyo), Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp and The Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation.

 

Photo credits: Patrick Jameson.
Image courtesy of the artist and Cento.

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